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Kevin Lloyd

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    Kevin Lloyd
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    Together School

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  1. About This File A social distancing PE pack with activities that can be done while social distancing measures are still in place. To share with colleagues in school to ensure PE can still have a place on the timetable! Developed by Kieran James - Twitter @KJamesPE Social distancing PE activities (1).pdf
  2. About This File A social distancing PE pack with activities that can be done while social distancing measures are still in place. To share with colleagues in school to ensure PE can still have a place on the timetable! Developed by Kieran James - Twitter @KJamesPE Social distancing PE activities (1).pdf View full article
  3. INTRODUCTION When schools closed early for Easter in March 2020, no one knew when they would open their doors again. Some felt that they would start as usual in late April, with the tacit expectation that the summer term would look similar to all the years that had preceded it. Within a few weeks, public exams had been abandoned for the year, and it was clear that the term would start substantially later than planned, if at all. Many schools had taken advantage of the Government’s Job Retention Scheme to defray the cost of workers no longer required. The word “furlough” had entered the public vocabulary. The impact upon sport was similarly rapid and dramatic. The final stages of national competitions due to be played in late March were cancelled. By mid- April all National Governing Bodies (NGBs) had suspended sport at every level, from grassroots to international. Most initially set review dates, but followed up with “until further notice” declarations, many of which still apply. Desperate attempts are underway to try to restore professional sport, especially in Soccer, Cricket and Rugby as these games are haemorrhaging money in the absence of televised competition. The Olympic Games has been postponed for a year, for the first time in its history. The implications for independent schools are enormous, and potentially catastrophic. The future of the sector is threatened. All are desperate to restore operations as early as can safely be managed, with whatever restrictions are necessary. There is a race to get back towards something recognisable, partly to address educational omissions, but also to justify fees. Sport and physical activity are a critical part of this. They are a distinguishing feature of the sector’s identity, and a central part of its business case. Also, they are the area of school life that will find it most difficult to accommodate travel, distancing and hygiene restrictions. The impact of the pandemic may influence the character of school sport forever. This could be either a positive or negative thing, depending upon how it is handled. It is vital that schools develop a coherent plan to handle the various stages of the process if they are to emerge with a programme that meets the needs of pupils, and is attractive to a potentially shrinking market. All contingency planning is based on an assumption that the pandemic will have an enduring, though diminishing, legacy. In a rapidly changing landscape, all expectations are conditional. Medical developments, especially the availability of a vaccine, treatment or antibody test, would change everything. Schools must hope for this, but plan for the alternatives. This plan will recognise the three stages of recovery. PADSIS - Rebooting School Sport.pdf
  4. INTRODUCTION When schools closed early for Easter in March 2020, no one knew when they would open their doors again. Some felt that they would start as usual in late April, with the tacit expectation that the summer term would look similar to all the years that had preceded it. Within a few weeks, public exams had been abandoned for the year, and it was clear that the term would start substantially later than planned, if at all. Many schools had taken advantage of the Government’s Job Retention Scheme to defray the cost of workers no longer required. The word “furlough” had entered the public vocabulary. The impact upon sport was similarly rapid and dramatic. The final stages of national competitions due to be played in late March were cancelled. By mid- April all National Governing Bodies (NGBs) had suspended sport at every level, from grassroots to international. Most initially set review dates, but followed up with “until further notice” declarations, many of which still apply. Desperate attempts are underway to try to restore professional sport, especially in Soccer, Cricket and Rugby as these games are haemorrhaging money in the absence of televised competition. The Olympic Games has been postponed for a year, for the first time in its history. The implications for independent schools are enormous, and potentially catastrophic. The future of the sector is threatened. All are desperate to restore operations as early as can safely be managed, with whatever restrictions are necessary. There is a race to get back towards something recognisable, partly to address educational omissions, but also to justify fees. Sport and physical activity are a critical part of this. They are a distinguishing feature of the sector’s identity, and a central part of its business case. Also, they are the area of school life that will find it most difficult to accommodate travel, distancing and hygiene restrictions. The impact of the pandemic may influence the character of school sport forever. This could be either a positive or negative thing, depending upon how it is handled. It is vital that schools develop a coherent plan to handle the various stages of the process if they are to emerge with a programme that meets the needs of pupils, and is attractive to a potentially shrinking market. All contingency planning is based on an assumption that the pandemic will have an enduring, though diminishing, legacy. In a rapidly changing landscape, all expectations are conditional. Medical developments, especially the availability of a vaccine, treatment or antibody test, would change everything. Schools must hope for this, but plan for the alternatives. This plan will recognise the three stages of recovery. PADSIS - Rebooting School Sport.pdf View full article
  5. About This File Context Introduction: As we move towards the planned wider re-opening of schools and facilities afPE has prepared this document to support the Physical Education, School Sport and Physical Activity (education based) workforce. Each school is different – some have been operating on a reduced pupil basis, in a different way, or the site has been closed completely. We want to stimulate discussion, allow schools to manage their situation as we know and understand that educational contexts are different in terms of the size, age and layout of buildings. Leaders are reminded to always follow Government and employer’s guidelines. The ultimate decision about pupil safety will depend on context and geography, and is therefore for individual headteachers to make, in consultation with their governing body. We know all colleagues want children and young people (C&YP) to be safe and well and it is also important that the workforce is protected and safe. Considerations regarding PPE (that have been available to special school staff and some mainstream schools, with pupils with high level medical and physical needs) and hand washing facilities must also be considered as part of whole school consideration around effective infection, protection and control. Below are three key questions you may want to consider in your planning: 1. Have you reviewed your risk assessments before re-commencing physical education? 2. Does your teaching activity meet the Government requirements? www.gov.uk/coronavirus 3. Are your teaching plans consistent with the requirement of any whole school/employer expectations which may have developed in response to the national guidance? Key principles for supporting safe PESSPA: • Clean frequently touched surfaces • Wash hands frequently as part of a clear hygiene regime • Minimise contact • Ensure good respiratory hygiene Ensure pupils are regularly informed about what good hygiene is. Decide the approach to enhance hygiene (for example, toilet use, hand washing) and decide on the policy related to usually shared items (for example, practical equipment). Ensure clear notices that build on NHS and Government guidance are on display, avoid information over load or the message will get lost. Posters are available for education settings. COVID-19-Interpreting-the-Government-Guidance-in-a-PESSPA-Context-FINAL (1).pdf
  6. About This File Context Introduction: As we move towards the planned wider re-opening of schools and facilities afPE has prepared this document to support the Physical Education, School Sport and Physical Activity (education based) workforce. Each school is different – some have been operating on a reduced pupil basis, in a different way, or the site has been closed completely. We want to stimulate discussion, allow schools to manage their situation as we know and understand that educational contexts are different in terms of the size, age and layout of buildings. Leaders are reminded to always follow Government and employer’s guidelines. The ultimate decision about pupil safety will depend on context and geography, and is therefore for individual headteachers to make, in consultation with their governing body. We know all colleagues want children and young people (C&YP) to be safe and well and it is also important that the workforce is protected and safe. Considerations regarding PPE (that have been available to special school staff and some mainstream schools, with pupils with high level medical and physical needs) and hand washing facilities must also be considered as part of whole school consideration around effective infection, protection and control. Below are three key questions you may want to consider in your planning: 1. Have you reviewed your risk assessments before re-commencing physical education? 2. Does your teaching activity meet the Government requirements? www.gov.uk/coronavirus 3. Are your teaching plans consistent with the requirement of any whole school/employer expectations which may have developed in response to the national guidance? Key principles for supporting safe PESSPA: • Clean frequently touched surfaces • Wash hands frequently as part of a clear hygiene regime • Minimise contact • Ensure good respiratory hygiene Ensure pupils are regularly informed about what good hygiene is. Decide the approach to enhance hygiene (for example, toilet use, hand washing) and decide on the policy related to usually shared items (for example, practical equipment). Ensure clear notices that build on NHS and Government guidance are on display, avoid information over load or the message will get lost. Posters are available for education settings. COVID-19-Interpreting-the-Government-Guidance-in-a-PESSPA-Context-FINAL (1).pdf View full article
  7. How to use this document:1. This document has been prepared for a New Zealand context, based on public health guidelines and our NZ Government Alert Levels. If using this for a different country, please adapt accordingly, and follow your own guidelines.2. Senior leaders, HOD’s, HPE leaders and teachers can engage with these guidelines and ideas.3. Please note, there are different Ministry of Health Guidelines for Early Childhood Centres (ECC). The nature of an Early Childhood Centre is very different, and therefore all ‘toys’, ‘equipment’, and spacing rules need to be considered and adhered to. As children in ECC’s are moving most of the time, we believe there is no need to treat the ‘physical activity context’ any differently to the guidelines on general play or handling of toys] etc. Therefore, the suggestions in this document are not designed for ECC specifically. Some suggestions could be used/modified if they meet the public health measures and Centre guidelines. These can be found here: https://education.govt.nz/covid-19/alert-level-3-faqs-for-schools-and-early-learning-centres#public-health-measures4. This document provides ideas for physical education or physical activity contexts to support physical distancing when equipment or sports gear cannot be shared between children, and they must be 2m apart.5. These suggestions have been based upon the most up to date information released by NZ Government.More on public health guidelines and Sport New Zealand’s advice for play, physical activity and sport can be found here:https://sportnz.org.nz/assets/Uploads/Play-Active-Recreation-and-Sport-at-Alert-Levels-4-4.pdfMore on the role of the school, and guidelines from the Ministry of Education for schools can be found here:https://www.education.govt.nz/covid-19/More on the general guidelines of Levels and what this means can be found here:https://covid19.govt.nz/6. We have based our comments on the types of movement we may typically see on school grounds. Physical Education classes, breaks and lunchtimes, play, fitness, sport and incidental movement (between classes, on and off school grounds).7. These guidelines should not supersede your school policy. For example, many schools have been informed that the role of the school in Alert Level 3 is to act as a ‘home’. This means teaching staff are supervising students to complete their independent online work in a safe space, whilst their caregivers or parents attend work. Therefore, teachers on site will not be planning, or facilitating lessons for students on school grounds.Please follow the instructions of your school leaders on this matter. If this is indeed the case, you may wish to use the ideas within this document to support break times from online learning, and for quality physical activity experiences throughout the day. L3-Guidelines-School-based-PE (1).pdf
  8. How to use this document: 1. This document has been prepared for a New Zealand context, based on public health guidelines and our NZ Government Alert Levels. If using this for a different country, please adapt accordingly, and follow your own guidelines. 2. Senior leaders, HOD’s, HPE leaders and teachers can engage with these guidelines and ideas. 3. Please note, there are different Ministry of Health Guidelines for Early Childhood Centres (ECC). The nature of an Early Childhood Centre is very different, and therefore all ‘toys’, ‘equipment’, and spacing rules need to be considered and adhered to. As children in ECC’s are moving most of the time, we believe there is no need to treat the ‘physical activity context’ any differently to the guidelines on general play or handling of toys] etc. Therefore, the suggestions in this document are not designed for ECC specifically. Some suggestions could be used/modified if they meet the public health measures and Centre guidelines. These can be found here: https://education.govt.nz/covid-19/alert-level-3-faqs-for-schools-and-early-learning-centres#public-health-measures 4. This document provides ideas for physical education or physical activity contexts to support physical distancing when equipment or sports gear cannot be shared between children, and they must be 2m apart. 5. These suggestions have been based upon the most up to date information released by NZ Government. More on public health guidelines and Sport New Zealand’s advice for play, physical activity and sport can be found here: https://sportnz.org.nz/assets/Uploads/Play-Active-Recreation-and-Sport-at-Alert-Levels-4-4.pdf More on the role of the school, and guidelines from the Ministry of Education for schools can be found here: https://www.education.govt.nz/covid-19/ More on the general guidelines of Levels and what this means can be found here: https://covid19.govt.nz/ 6. We have based our comments on the types of movement we may typically see on school grounds. Physical Education classes, breaks and lunchtimes, play, fitness, sport and incidental movement (between classes, on and off school grounds). 7. These guidelines should not supersede your school policy. For example, many schools have been informed that the role of the school in Alert Level 3 is to act as a ‘home’. This means teaching staff are supervising students to complete their independent online work in a safe space, whilst their caregivers or parents attend work. Therefore, teachers on site will not be planning, or facilitating lessons for students on school grounds. Please follow the instructions of your school leaders on this matter. If this is indeed the case, you may wish to use the ideas within this document to support break times from online learning, and for quality physical activity experiences throughout the day. L3-Guidelines-School-based-PE (1).pdf View full article
  9. Transport Canada has recently released guidelines and recommendations for the safe operation of School Busses during the COVID-19 Pandemic. This document shares some interesting insights that International Schools who are operating a School Bus Service may want to consider. The document addresses things to consider before, during and after a trip. https://www2.tc.gc.ca/en/services/road/federal-guidance-school-bus-operations-during-covid-19-pandemic.html View full article
  10. The International School Recovery Forum recently sat together with seven International Schools Physical Education leaders. The purpose was to discuss how to continue Physical Education with the restrictions coming from the COVID-19 Pandemic. The discussion covered available space, time limitations, learning criteria, teacher availability, adapting and communications. This is a summary of their recommendations on how to manage the challenges. Participating schools included: Anglo American School Moscow International School Düsseldorf American School of London Copenhagen International School Sreenidhi International School & Sreenidhi Sports Academy Zurich International School American School of Barcelona Physical Education Round Table Insights - June 9 2020.pdf
  11. According to experts, COVID-19 will persist to be a challenge as long as there is no vaccine. Most experts and schools from surveys we have done, believe it is prudent to be prepared to manage COVID-19 during the 2020/21 school year. With Transportation Service this is especially important as customer expectations and demands for their children’s safety and security are critical to manage. The recommendation from successful schools after reopening is to have a service supported by use of an App that engages the parents providing: Transparent information about route schedules Delays to pick-up or drop-off time Way to share critical information like elevated temperature or sickness Attendance Ad hoc requests for students to take busses By focusing on this, schools will be better able to provide a robust, flexible, and financially viable service which will create confidence in parents allowing their children to use the school bus. Of course, this confidence will have a direct and positive impact on ridership and willingness to pay. This is something that schools have stated after reopening is that families feel safer using the school’s transportation service instead of public transportation. We recently held a roundtable discussion on Transportation Services and discussed the following areas: Communication Health and Hygiene Planning Pickup to School Start / Dismissal to Drop Off Documentation The results of this discussion are below. Planning operational flexibility Have the mindset that change is inevitable and will require a readiness to adapt on short notice. Plan how you will respond to situational changes (absences, school schedule changes, regulations, and policy changes, etc.) which impact the ability to deliver the required service. Align with your bus company regarding schedule flexibility for both drivers and buses. Respond to regulations that impact the delivery of service e.g. temperature, ventilation, occupancy, partitions between seats or driver etc. Work with your bus company to find the best solution on how to manage this in the most cost effective and user-friendly way. Enable means of communication to inform parents about “last-minute” schedule changes and allow for parents to communicate absences which allows for optimize route planning. Integrate transportation planning with overall school planning and communication. Planning Financial Viability Bus occupancy may be impacted by fluctuating attendance and schedules, optimize this through a scheduling and planning tool. If necessary, to vary routes daily, consider the impact on drivers and families – consider using an App to guide drivers and inform families. Suspend travel insurance (if possible) when the school is not operating. Work proactively with bus companies on price and costs - bear in mind the importance of your school’s business on the overall business of the bus company – this may have implications on their ability to return to service or your power of negotiation to make changes Determine who will take the costs for bus driver safety as well as any impact to driver unemployment benefits which may result from returning part-time. Renegotiate contracts if possible, to allow for flexibility in case of future service breaks or changes that are necessary. Explore alternative use of buses/revenue streams if possible, such as transporting other items between homes and school. Pickup to School Start / Dismissal to Drop Off Cohorts Morning: coordinate students arriving from the buses into cohorts (class or grade or location) to enter the school Afternoon: coordinate movement of students from cohorts (class or grade or location) to bus cohorts when they leave the school Staggered arrival and dismissals Plan staging areas to manage staggered arrival before school start and dismissals prior to student’s departure to buses Monitors Use monitors on your buses to ensure drivers can focus on safe bus operations. Monitors can: Enforce regulations – social distancing, wearing masks or shields, hand washing, etc. Monitoring student health Conduct screening / temperature checking (must ensure accuracy of the tool and provide training) Apply disinfectant to hands especially younger students Screening and Isolation Plan where and when these checks will be done At pickup – outside bus will require planning of stops so that traffic is not impacted Upon arrival at school – consider implications on moving students from bus to the school. Upon departure from school – in class, at staging areas or at bus Plan for any impact these procedures have on schedules Determine what information is critical to capture and document especially considering privacy Ensure Isolation areas are provided Bus: Have a plan to isolate students on the bus, should they show symptoms School: Provide a location to isolate individual students or even the full bus Communication Overall Transportation communication needs to be coordinated with the overall school communication. The processes that are communicated for transportation need to be integrated with the school’s processes Use videos to show how things are planned to look when the school reopens Make it clear what is being planned – entire school needs to have a vision Start communicating before reopening (2 months for instance) on a weekly basis Have an App which is integrated with communication is very useful – otherwise need to use paper forms every day Documenting absences in advance is helpful for planning Temperature check confirmation of above or below a certain temperature is easier than administration of having forms Route changes with information on pick up or drop off times can help ensure that families know what is happening Highlighting new procedures Delays on the bus for pick-up or drop-off with parents waiting with younger students Involve Parent Association using a good messaging channel such as WhatsApp / WeChat etc. Email is an alternative but often not checked regularly so not reliable that the information has been received by everyone Intranet is useful for documenting information for the community looking for how things work Ensure that privacy is important and is being followed Health and Hygiene – for both students and drivers Temperature screening Parents to check the temperature in the morning and provide confirmation that the temperature is below or above a threshold Monitors on the bus check temperature of students and are allowed to refuse student entry into the bus – this is only happening if the monitor sees the student clearly ill. (Considerations here include the amount of time to do this at every stop including blocking the road, training the monitors on how to handle taking temperatures and monitors assessing if student is sick) Each student will be checked at school by the nurse. This temperature check is the only valid temperature check for sending a student home If a student has elevated temperature (done by the nurse) then the student needs to wait in a “isolation area” and be picked up by a parent Temperature reporting Avoid providing detail temperature information (just a yes or no that temperature is above or below a threshold – that will be easier with privacy laws such as GDPR) Parents to provide confirmation before entering the bus if the student’s temperature is below or above a threshold Travel Updates Parents to confirm that they have not traveled in restricted zone or country Mask requirements Masks may not be required by the government, but they help reduce the risk or spread. If masks are required, then determine how to enforce this requirement i.e. in the morning – no mask means no bus ride. Offer masks for the return trip which school will provide Put siblings together on the bus Ventilation When possible drive with the windows open to reduce the spread (see article on spreading with cough - Hygiene Clean bus after each route – and if mandated, document the process Hand Sanitization and processes Provide hand sanitizer when entering the bus. Consider having a monitor to apply this to students’ hands, especially younger students When departing school, provide hand sanitizer / handwashing stations or require hands to be washed prior to leaving class Plan for how the hand sanitizer will be replenished Illness A child is on the bus and starts to show signs of illness you should isolate the child on the bus such as having the last rows on the bus for this. Then must consider if necessary, to isolate entire bus upon arrival at school If a child later tests positive, follow government requirements. Consider that you may need to quarantine entire bus, class, etc., until students can be cleared with a negative test. Regulations and Policies Local / state regulations often dictate minimum standards for safety, hygiene, etc. Prepare to meet these standards while aligning to school requirements as well Establish school policies and procedures that include screening, social distancing, health, hygiene, and safety Enforcement Plan for implications to policy enforcement -i.e. denied boarding, “isolation area”, etc. Be consistent when enforcing policies Quarantine suspected or confirmed cases Have parents sign a form acknowledging policies and regulations, as well as any updates Alignment Policies and procedures must be aligned with school Documentation Keep it simple Integrate it into an App otherwise too extensive Have a database of response but not with detailed information – such as temperature above or below 37.5 but not specifically the temperature
  12. The Munich International School is prepared for the future with the systems in place for a successful start to school in August 2020 and has presented this great video detailing how things will look. This is an excellent tool to increase confidence in the school community and to new prospective families.With spacious teaching spaces in six separate buildings, MIS has easily adapted to government regulations for hygiene and the highest standards of safety.Video created by MIS alumna Lauren Emery ('18)
  13. Guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics encourage “having students physically present in school.” Dr. Sean O’Leary, an authorof that advice, explains why. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/30/us/coronavirus-schools-reopening-guidelines-aap.html?referringSource=articleShare
  14. COVID-19 playlist - #physed activities that can be used with distancing/sanitizing measures in place (for full groups, small groups, gym use, etc). Plan ahead for what fall might bring, or use now over summer #education if needed.
  15. The challenge of reopening and being prepared for recovery from the Pandemic is a daunting task. There are no experts that have been through something like this. However, tackling recovery through a systematic approach can help schools ensure that their plans are complete. Having qualified and experienced professionals reviewing and providing suggestions can give that assurance and peace of mind that your school’s plan is comprehensive and complete. The Recovery Plan Assessment covers a range of pertinent policies and procedures including safety, health, risk and response and the foundation. There are three levels of assessments: Complete Recovery Plan Assessment covering the full range of areas needed for recovery Foundation Recovery Plan Assessment covering the core or foundation areas needed for recovery Focus Area Recovery Plan Assessment covering a deep dive into one area needed for recovery Free initial consultation!! Complete Recovery Plan Assessment: Opening and closing (pre-opening requirements, criteria for closing and reopening) Access (campus assess controls including visitors, movement between rooms / buildings, bathrooms, etc.) Operations (transportation safety and efficiency, health and hygiene protocols including clearing, cafeteria and eating protocols, sports programme, community association activities, field trips, outdoor activities, etc.) Communication (strategy and protocols for staff, parents, and students) Programme Management (educational delivery such as managing Room to Zoom and teacher constraints) People Management (physical and psychological well-being for staff and students) Budget (including funding) considerations €2,500 Foundation Recovery Plan Assessment: Opening and closing (pre-opening requirements, criteria for closing and reopening) Access (campus assess controls including visitors, movement between rooms / buildings, bathrooms, etc.) Operations (transportation safety and efficiency, health and hygiene protocols including clearing, cafeteria and eating protocols, sports programme, community association activities, field trips, outdoor activities, etc.) Communication (strategy and protocols for staff, parents, and students) €1,500 Focus Area Recovery Plan Assessment - your choice of one of the following areas: Opening and closing (pre-opening requirements, criteria for closing and reopening) Access (campus assess controls including visitors, movement between rooms / buildings, bathrooms, etc.) Operations (transportation safety and efficiency, health and hygiene protocols including clearing, cafeteria and eating protocols, sports programme, community association activities, field trips, outdoor activities, etc.) Communication (strategy and protocols for staff, parents, and students) Programme Management (educational delivery such as managing Room to Zoom and teacher constraints) People Management (physical and psychological well-being for staff and students) Budget (including funding) considerations €1,000 The Assessment includes: One-hour consultation call defining the deliverables and understanding the key issues Our consultants will review pertinent records and documents, conduct interviews as necessary and provide assessments and recommendations on your plan Our consultants will formalize the insights highlighting areas that need to be addressed with recommendations in a short summary One-hour consultation call to review the document with you School can work on updating the plan to provide amendments and improvements One-hour consultation call to finalize the plan The Recovery Plan Assessment will be done by Clearpath Alerts, LLC and Together School Ltd. Clearpath Alerts (www.clearpathalerts.com) which provides customized and actionable resiliency strategies and solutions and Together School (www.together-school.com) which provides communication solutions for transportation, attendance and more including emergency management. Clearpath Alerts and Together School work collaboratively with a variety of schools, universities, corporations, and non-profit entities providing valued services. For further Information on Recovery Assessments please contact us at info@together-school.com or in comments below with your name, contact details and your focus area.
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